Energy

20130704_214725

I was relaxing on the shore of a beautiful tropical beach.  The serene scene offered soothing moments of rejuvenation.  The warm sun and the flow of the waves brought a feeling of muscle relaxation and mental freedom.

Into this milieu rushed a barking, energetic Jack Russell terrier followed closely by its’ owner.  The owner was dutifully carrying a bundle of beach-appropriate packages.  As I was observing peace-intruding couple, I was expecting to see the dog owner unpack a variety of sun loving toys: beach shoes, hats, towels, cold drinks, surf board, flippers, snorkel, etc.

Even though the owner was dressed in appropriate swimwear, what I saw was amazing. She unpacked a large, 5 gallon, plastic bucket filled with brightly colored tennis balls and a tennis racket. The Jack Russell terrier’s energy level instantly elevated.  The tiny dog ran unabashed straight into the ocean.  The animal had no concern for consequences.  This reaction was obviously triggered by the owner’s actions. The tiny canine was whipped around by the ebb and flow of the waves yet remained staunch in his resolve.  The dog turned back toward the direction of its’ owner and waited while being tossed about by the current.

The owner ceremoniously lifted the tennis racket into the air, picked up a handful of tennis balls and, with gusto, began smacking them into the ocean waves toward the direction of the transfixed terrier.

Without regard for life or limb, the tiny dog dove into the waves. After a few anxious moments, the canine surfaced holding three of the fluorescent tennis balls wedged into and bulging from, his small mouth.  He enthusiastically ran onto the shore to return the projectiles.  After laying the retrieved tennis balls at her feet, the terrier immediately ran back into the ocean to repeat the exercise.

I walked over to the owner and remarked about the unique form of exercise that she had devised for her dog.  “Believe me, I have tried everything else and this is the best way to tire him out. He loves it.”  My first thought was that everyone should be so lucky as to find a specific exercise that they love to do every day that totally tires them out.  One that they do with energy and dedication that fills them with joy and abandonment.

Find your EXERCISE and use your ENERGY!

 

 

Advertisements

Recovery

2518 South 12th St - Springfield, ILWhenever we are not at our best we need to recover.  Sometimes it’s because we are ill or we have been a little sad or we have were physically injured. This process can be from a perceived or actual problem.  It is a time of replenishment and redemption and rescue.  Our body and our mind need to quiet – to be still.

This is a difficult process in our society, especially today.  Our society is geared toward achieving, doing, producing and showing results in our endeavors.  That normally means that we are in motion, we are using our energy to make something happen.  If we are not constantly showing others that we are being a productive member of society then we may become less productive – possibly invisible in society.

However, recovery demands that we relax, we stop, we slowly breath – we heal.  This, of course, produces mental anxiety.  We are surrounded by bodies that are in constant motion and every fiber in our body is telling us to do just the opposite.  Even if we do isolate ourselves from this fray of perpetually moving objects, our inclination is to quickly jump back into the whirlwind of motion.  Again, our internal mental voice tells us – wait you’re not ready, producing more anxiety.

Obviously,  the recovery process contains it’s own brand of stress.  The key is to not “bow” to this idea and elevate this idea to “distress.”  So, if you are in need of some form of recovery – take the time to do just that, recover.  Resist the urge to jump back into the whirlwind too soon and understand that stress will always be part of the process – but you can handle it because you are recovering.

April Reflections

New Year resolutions may be testing our limits right about this time of year.  Sure we started out with the best intentions.  Energy levels high, resolve resolute, motivation staunch and we’re positive that this year all of our stated goals will be reached.   So, a few months has tested our intentions.

20140522_110208

Nature seems to have kept its’ promise – flowers are blooming, the grass is growing, weeds are popping out in the most unwanted places, birds and bees are busy with the reproduction of their species so are we, us humans, keeping to our task and fulfilling our resolutions?

Are we hitting those resolutions hard like we said that we would?  Are we spending more quality time with our family? Are we shedding those unwanted pounds?  Are we better at balancing our financial affairs? Are we making sure that our daily outlook is more positive?  We probably can answer “yes” and “no.”  Humans often forget about the emotional factor – the part that makes us human.  Of course, we have the best intentions when making a promise to ourselves to make our lives better.  No one intentionally wants to have a horrible life or a life filled with failure or sadness.  However,  sometimes that little entity of “emotion” seems to always enter the picture.  Some days we are tired, or sad, or confused, or too busy, or over-whelmed, or irritated or just too lazy to “stick to the path.”

That is when our resolve is most important.  Give yourself a present as we approach this last week of April, look at your new year’s resolutions and reeve up your resolve…